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Alphabetical History Repeats: Jaguar’s F-Type Coupe.

AUS2013112001582_PRVEasily one of the most anticipated cars of recent times was the F-Type convertible from Jaguar. Released to thunderous acclaim, it’s re-entered Jaguar back into the realm of sports cars and the public eye. Jaguar Australia’s own management admitted it was a heartstarter for the brand here with sales steady but hurting from a lack of public recognition or memory. With a broad track and wheelbase underpinning what surely is one of the most beautiful looking bodies on wheels, motivated by a cracking trio of engines including the ripsnorting, firebreathing supercharged 5.0L V8, growling out 364kW and 635 torques, the soft top version drew worldwide attention immediately. But something was missing….unlike its famous predecessor, the E-Type, this one was only available with a easily removed soft top.

On the 19th of November , just before 8pm Pacific Standard Time, the dreams of Jaguarphiles were realised, with the unveiling of the stunningly gorgeous F-Type Coupe. Immediately comparisons were made with its famous brethren, with the aggressive styling at the front running into the smooth, lithe curves of the hard top, a profile so akin to the E-Type. However, much like a supermodel with an IQ of 200, there’s much more than fantastic curves….the all aluminuim construction shaves weight while adding rigidity, especially to the rear of the car. Having no B pillars, AUS2013112041769_PRVtechnology came to the rescue with a hydro-formed aluminuim alloy beam that runs almost the length of the coupe’s immensely strong and rigid body. Adding to the strength are the side panels; they’re single pieces, cold pressed from one sheet of aluminuim, which also eliminates join lines and potential weak spots from bolts and screws; Jaguar is also highly green with up to 50% of the construction sourced from recycled material. With the engineering prowess on display, the F-Type Coupe has a torsional rigidity reading of 33000 Newton metres per degree, a figure unchanged if you specify the glass top roof option instead of a total sheet of metal.

At the pointy end Jaguar has given the five litre a dose of Viagra; power is upped to 404kW and 680 Newton metres in the F-Type R whilst the F-TYPE S Coupé and F-TYPE Coupé are powered by Jaguar’s 3.0-litre V6 supercharged petrol engines in 280kW/460Nm and 250Kw/450Nm AUS2013112081462_PRVforms respectively, giving 0-100k/h in 4.9/5.3-seconds and top speeds of 275/260km/h.All through power through Jaguar’s lauded eight speed automatic transmission, operable both from the centre console lever or steering column mounted paddle shifts. Hauling up the beast are optional Carbon Ceramic Matrix (CCM) brakes. Vivid yellow monoblock calipers – six-piston at the front and four-piston at the rear – grip 398mm front and 380mm rear brake discs made from a matrix of carbon fibre and ceramic, which is extremely hard and highly resistant to wear.

The cabin is a workspace you’d be hard pressed to leave, with ultra supportive and comfortable leather seats, with the R also getting inflatable side bolsters for extra bodily support. Acclaimed British audio manufacturer Meridian also supply a choice of two high powered, multi speaker audio systems with 10 or 12 speakers pumping either 380W or 770W respectively, not that you’d want to listen to anything other than that superbly tailored exhaust. On the road there’s plenty of safety systems in place in case the driver gets too (understandably) exuberant, including powerful AUS2013112001771_PRVABS brakes, multiple airbags and the F-Type’s aerobrake. Nestled in the shapely rear of the car is a wing that rises out of the metalwork at 110 kmh and drops back in once under 80, keeping the rump firmly planted.

Sadly for Australia, the F-Type Coupe won’t be available until after July of 2014 and pricing is yet to be confirmed at time of writing. For me, it’s a car I’d have, in all variations, parked in my garage.

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