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Australian Driving by State, Age, Gender & Car Type

A recent survey conducted by the Social Research Centre confirms our own startling research survey conclusions conducted a year or so ago.
Australian drivers are simply not getting any better.

For example, a staggering 61 percent admitted illegally using mobile phones whilst driving, a shocking 30 percent said they had sent text messages and one in four believed they could drive 10 kph above the speed limit in a 100kph zone without being fined.
 
Sadly these are not the most serious indiscretions revealed in this government – backed driver survey
An alarming one in six of those surveyed admitted falling asleep at the wheel, and up to 1 in 10 drivers said they had driven while they thought they might have been above the legal alcohol limit at least once in the last twelve months. 

Our own Private Fleet survey conducted amongst a much larger cross section reached similar conclusions and also showed many more concerning traits.
• Young Toyota drivers are 40 percent more likely than the average driver to talk on the phone whilst driving but they are 30 percent less likely to drink and drive.
• Female drivers fare well except that they are more likely to text when driving than their male counterparts.
• Holden holds the unenviable title of housing Australia’s worst drivers, whereas Mazda comes out top as having the best behaved drivers.
• The Australian Capital Territory can proudly claim to have the best behaved drivers in the country. But South Australia takes the booby prize, however the worst driving individual segment  goes, perhaps unsurprisingly, to NSW ‘P’ platers
• Tasmanian drivers are more likely to speed than their Victorian cousins.
• Remarkably 51 percent of West Australian drivers admitted to having consumed three or more standard drinks before driving.

Does this sound right to you?  Put your own theories to the test here – and feel free to add your comment below…

7 comments

  1. Elizabeth Farrugia says:

    I am shocked with the amount of motorists that do not stick to the speed limit on our highways and motorways. Recently, whilst travelling to the Central Coast via the M5, I noticed how whilst in the outside fast lane, that motorists try and bully me to move left. I understand the road rules to stick to the left unless overtaking however, if there is a lot of traffic and cannot move to the left lane, then staying on the outside lane is the alternative as long as one doesn’t go above the speed limit.

    The speed limit on the M5 in most areas is 100-110kms per hour, I observed that without a patrol car around, nearly 95% plus motorists go well above this speed limit. It isn’t any wonder I get so frustrated and angry whilst driving when I’m trying to do the right thing! It’s like everyone has the biggest egos now and this inflation of human ego is on the rise! What an immature pack of motorists we are becoming!

    February 18th, 2010 at 9:56 am

  2. Keith says:

    It would help if the State Govt encouraged or legislated a lot more defensive driving courses, for ALL ages, instead of constantly penalising people. They need to LEARN to drive. The best move that happened for me was when my company paid for a defensive driving course. I had been driving for 27 years yet learnt so many new skills & attitudes that really changed the way I drive. Touch wood, I haven’t had a road accident since. (although a few parking bingles at ½ K per hour)

    Keith Knox

    February 18th, 2010 at 10:49 am

  3. brian says:

    i drive over 40,000klms a year in nsw & mostly above the speed limit, if i am overtaken or passed it is mostly by young female p plate drivers, so this research doesn’t surprise me.
    brian

    February 18th, 2010 at 11:41 am

  4. Carol Buchanan says:

    I am surprised that your survey picks Mazda drivers as the best because as a sales rep ,I have done a lot of driving and I have noticed that the Mazda drivers are becoming as bad as Holden and Ford drivers. The younger ones predominately. The seem to want to pass anything that is in front of them and then cut in when they feel like it. With all due respect there are a lot of idiots on the road and no amount of talking to them and trying to educate them is going to help. Once an idiot, always an idiot.

    February 19th, 2010 at 9:19 am

  5. Josephine says:

    I drive to and from work every day in a semi-rural area in QLD that has hills, sharp bends and bad road conditions. I have lost count the number of times I have been tailgated and bullied on the road.

    People are crazy and it’s mainly young women in small cars, young men/tradie’s in utes and soccer moms in SUV’s that are the worst drivers EVER.

    Here is a solution. Driver’s get fines and demerit points when they do something wrong and it doesn’t stop them from doing it again. So why not do the opposite? Any driver caught doing the RIGHT thing gets bonus points on their license and a checque from the government. Basically saying ‘thank you for being a good driver.’

    If people get a stick for those doing wrong, there should be an equal carrot for those doing right!

    February 21st, 2010 at 10:05 pm

  6. Robyn says:

    STOP SPEEDING YOU WEIRDOS! THERE IS A SPEED LIMIT ON THIS ROAD SO STOP TAILGAITING ME. I WILL NOT BREAK THE LAW. I WILL NOT DRIVE FASTER FOR YOU. WHY ARE YOU IN SUCH A HURRY TO GET TO WORK ANYWAY?

    WHAT SORT OF SOCIETY DO WE LIVE IN WHERE WE PICK AND CHOOSE WHICH LAWS WE WILL FOLLOW? IF THE LAW SAYS STEALING IS WRONG – DO NOT STEAL. IF THE LAW SAYS SPEEDING IS WRONG – DON’T SPEED. SIMPLE. THIS IS JUST TOO COMPLICATED FOR THE AVERAGE AUSSIE IT SEEMS.

    February 21st, 2010 at 10:12 pm

  7. Don says:

    I have a young apprentice and whilst working on a large construction site in Sydney
    the foreman was telling me that they had 13 apprentices of which all 13 had to be
    drug and alcohol for working on-site, 13 failed and all these are driving cars as well.
    This is a concerned as they had 4 weeks notice that they were getting tested and failed the drug test.
    So what test should be conducted for the on road RBT if this is happening at work sites, all the apprentices lost the apprenticeships.

    February 22nd, 2010 at 7:14 am