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K to R of Surfing Vehicles Dude

“Surfs up!”

“Dude, how am I gonna get there?”

“Bro, you need a car!”

Summer is here, and surfing is a great lifestyle for getting out, chasing the waves, and getting some immunity-boosting Vitamin D.  In fact, any sort of outdoor adventure and exercise will see you a fitter and healthier person for getting out there and doing it.  What 2022 cars make for an ideal surfer’s companion?  The following are several useful vehicles that, if you’re wanting something to get you places, will transport you, a friend or two, some gear, and surfboards/mountain bikes through something more than just a little puddle, mud or soft sand.

Dedicated vans with AWD or MPVs are potentially great for surfing travels with one, two or more mates.  Some, but not all, will offer AWD.  Depending on how far down onto the beach you want to get your MPV or Van, AWD is definitely the way to go for getting through soft sand and sticky situations.  Having a vehicle that can get you across country and down onto the beach makes for the ultimate surfer’s vehicle.

There are some very good vehicles worth a look if you’re into doing a bit of surfing, fishing and any outdoor adventure.  Aside from an AWD Van or AWD MPV, here are the best of them from K (Kia) to R (Renault).  Let us know if we’ve missed anything in between!

Kia Sorento

The seven-seat Kia Sorento SUV is one of the most advanced vehicles in its class.  If you find parking a mean trick, then it can even park itself without anyone inside. Quiet, roomy and with a large boot, the Sorento is available in Sport, Sport+ and GT-Line and the choice of a front-drive 3.5-litre 200 kW/332 Nm V6 petrol with an eight-speed auto gearbox, an AWD dual-clutch auto 148 kW/440 Nm 2.2-litre four-cylinder turbo-diesel or a 190 kW/350 Nm PHEV.  The roomy cabin is enhanced by a commodious 616-litre boot that increases to a massive, all-seats-folded 2011 litres.

Land Rover Defender

Ultimate 4×4 traction.  The 2.0-litre D200, D240 and D250 diesels produce 147 kW/430 Nm, 177 kW/430 Nm and 183 kW/570 Nm respectively, while the petrol engines output 221 kW/400 Nm, 294 kW/550 Nm and 386 kW/625 Nm.  All Defenders are highly capable, dual-range 4x4s, all driving through an eight-speed auto gearbox.  Up to 2231 litres of boot space gives you plenty of space to sleep!  5-star safe.

Land Rover Discovery

Ultimate 4×4 traction with added sophistication. Of course, the Range Rover alternative is luxury to the max!  Discoverys are big on comfort and refinement and offer up to 2104 litres of sleeping space.  5-star safe.

LDV D90

A big, cushy, well-priced 7-seater with 5-doors.  Sitting on a strong ladder-frame chassis and boasting a punchy 160 kW/480 Nm, 2.0-litre bi-turbo-diesel with an eight-speed auto transmission this is a seriously decent machine.  Offering rear-drive or dual-range 4WD with multi-mode terrain selection, off-roading is a breeze.  5-star safe and providing up to 2382 litres of sleeping space.

Mahindra XUV500 W10

A 7-seater with 5 doors and a 6-speed auto, the Mahindra XUV500 SUV is one of the best-value mid-size seven-seaters in Australia.  It is powered by a 103 kW/320 Nm 2.2-litre turbo-petrol engine.  AWD form is the best version and performs well off-road.  Let down only by a 4-star safety rating, the Mahindra has over 700 litres of boot space with the third row seats flat and grows to an excellent mattress in the back material.  You also get a five-year/100,000km warranty with five years of roadside assist when bought new.

Mitsubishi Outlander

Mitsubishi’s fourth generation Outlander SUV is a roomy 5-door wagon that is comfortable to drive, has all the modern tech, offering its owner plenty of space.  Available in AWD, running with an 8-speed CVT gearbox, and using the new 135 kW/245 Nm 2.5-litre engine this is a reliable unit that will take you and your mates places.  Boot space is up to 1461 litres, safety is 5-star, and you also get Mitsubishi’s class-leading 10 year/200,000 km warranty.

Mitsubishi Pajero Sport

Another highly rated surfer’s wagon, the 2022 Mitsubishi Pajero Sport Wagon.  With its 8-speed automatic gearbox is smooth.  It’s a dual-range unit with Low and High, so 4×4 traction combines with a high ground clearance and long-travel suspension to ensure plenty of off-road capability.  There’s heaps of passenger space and it’s surprisingly smooth and comfortable on the road.  The Pajero Sport is available in both five and seven-seat form and is powered by a 2.4-litre, 4-cylinder turbo-diesel producing 133 kW/430 Nm.  5-star safety and a boot space that’s huge. The Pajero Sport boasts a big, square cargo space and boasts 673-litres of cargo volume even up to the second row.  Fold the second row down as well and it’s cavernous.

Nissan X-Trail

The sharp-looking Nissan X-Trail is a real surfer’s choice.  Nissan’s X-Trail continues to rate among the best cargo-carriers in its class.  It feels nifty on the road and is five-star safe.  The AWD version uses a naturally-aspirated petrol engine with 126 kW/233 Nm.  Boot space is huge and close to 2000 litres, enough to lie down and stretch your legs out overnight.

Renault Koleos

A pretty cool looking wagon is the new Koleos from Renault.  Nissan’s X-Trail and Renault’s Koleos have teamed up and are based on the same platform.  Five-star safe and superbly comfortable, Renault’s five-seat Koleos mid-size SUV combines attractive looks and excellent people and luggage-carrying abilities.  There’s a choice, at the top-level for 4WD, and the 126 kW/226 Nm 2.5-litre petrol engine drives through a modern CVT transmission.  Boot space is almost 2000 litres!

A to J of Surfing Vehicles Dude

“Surfs up!”

“Dude, how am I gonna get there?”

“Bro, you need a car!”

Summer is here, and surfing is a great lifestyle for getting out, chasing the waves, and getting some immunity-boosting Vitamin D.  In fact, any sort of outdoor adventure and exercise will see you a fitter and healthier person for getting out there and doing it.  What 2022 cars make for an ideal surfer’s companion?  The following are several useful vehicles that, if you’re wanting something to get you places, will transport you, a friend or two, some gear, and surfboards/mountain bikes through something more than just a little puddle, mud or soft sand.

Dedicated vans or MPVs with AWD like the Volkswagen Multivan, LDV G10, Mercedes-Benz V-Class, Kia Carnival, Mercedes-Benz Valente, Volkswagen Caravelle, Honda Odyssey, Hyundai STARIA, Volkswagen California, Toyota Granvia, Mercedes-Benz Marco Polo ACTIVITY, and the Volkswagen Caddy are potentially great for surfing travels with one, two or more mates.  Some, but not all, will offer AWD.  Depending on how far down onto the beach you want to get your MPV or Van, AWD is definitely the way to go for getting through soft sand and out of sticky situations.

For years, wagons and SUVs have also been a go-to machine for the surfer; for good reason too as they offer plenty of space, the capacity for lugging gear, and for sleeping.  But having a vehicle that can get you across country and down onto the beach makes for the ultimate surfer’s vehicle.  Outside of the list of vans and MPVs above, there are some great vehicles still worth a look if you’re into doing a bit of surfing, fishing or any type of outdoor adventure.

Here is the best of them, first article of three, from A (Alfa Romeo) to J (Jeep).  Let us know if we’ve missed anything in between!

Alfa Romeo Stelvio

Three petrol engines offer the Stelvio between 147–375 kW of power and 330–600 Nm of torque.  The 8-speed automatic and 4×4 (AWD) ability make it ideal for heading off tar seal.  It has 5-doors, 5-seats, a 5-star ANCAP safety rating, and 1600 litres of boot space when the rear seats are folded flat.

Audi Q Wagons

 

Audi Q5 and Q7 models are idyllic; the Q3 maybe a little small, however.  All of these are stylish, AWD and superbly comfortable.  Diesel and petrol engines are available that offer the Q5 and Q7 between 150–251 kW of power and 370–700 Nm of torque.  4×4 (AWD) ability make them perfect for nosing about off-road.  Both Q models have 5-doors, 5-seats, and a 5-star ANCAP safety rating.  The Q5 has 1530 litres of boot space with the rear seats folded flat; Q7 has 1971 litres.

Audi A6 Allroad

Cargo room extends to 1680 litres with the rear seats folded down, and the AWD Quattro system ensures that you’ll get around secondary roads and the odd track pretty comfortably in an A6 Allroad.  A nice wagon to drive, and the surfboard can go on the roof or slide in along the flat cargo area.  A sportier drive than a similarly capable Subaru Outback.  The Audi A6 Allroad Wagon 45TDI is offered in Australia and runs with a tiptronic 8-speed quattro drive.  The 3.0-litre Turbo-Diesel is a peach, packing a healthy 183 kW/600 Nm from its V6 configuration, and scampers from a standstill to 100 km/h in less than 7 seconds.

BMW X3, X5

 

BMW X3 and X5 models are really nice SUV wagons for open road touring.  All are stylish, AWD, and superbly comfortable.  Diesel, electric and petrol engines are available for the X3 that offers between 135–285 kW of power and 300–620 Nm of torque.  X5 models get between 170 and 460 kW of power and 450–750 Nm of torque.  4×4 (AWD) ability make them handy when getting down to the beach or picnic area.  All X models have 5-doors, 5-seats, a 5-star ANCAP safety rating, and the X3 has 1600 litres of boot space with the rear seats folded flat; X5 has 2047 litres.

Ford Everest

The Ford Everest is magnificent.  Its 3.2 Diesel Turbo engine delivers 157 kW and 500 Nm.  The 10-speed automatic and serious 4×4 capability ensure you won’t easily get stuck in this one.  Smooth, loads of road presence, and comfortable, there isn’t many negatives.  1796 litres of boot space is available with the seats folded down.  It has 5-doors, 5-seats, and a 5-star ANCAP safety rating.

Haval H9

The big Haval H9 SUV Wagon gets a standard adaptive six-mode 4×4 terrain control system and a 700 mm wading depth.  The 180 kW/350 Nm turbo-four petrol/eight-speed auto is smooth and impresses.  A massive boot space combined with excellent features and a relaxing drive makes it a great surfing/adventure vehicle.  It’s also keenly priced.

Hyundai Santa Fe

Hyundai’s 7-seat Santa Fe SUV is large.  With a choice between a 206 kW/336 Nm 3.5-litre V6 petrol or a 147 kW/440 Nm 2.2-litre turbo-diesel four, the Santa Fe range is a great driving machine and is available in AWD.  Comfortable, and particularly well set-up in diesel guise, the Santa Fe is a warm travelling companion.  Boot space: 2042 litres.

Isuzu MU-X

A 7-seater with five doors and a rugged 3.0 Turbo-diesel motor is hard to overlook.  Stylish and tough, Isuzu’s new MU-X seven-seat off-roader comes in three spec levels (LS-M, LS-U and range-topping LS-T), each with the option of RWD or 4WD and standard with a six-speed automatic transmission.  140 kW and 450 Nm of torque match with a 3.5 tonne towing capacity.  ANCAP five-star safety and a boot space of 2138 litres makes the MU-X a perfect surfer’s wagon.

Jeep Wrangler

The LWB Jeep Wranglers are stunning lookers.  Perfect in every way but only let down by a rather mediocre safety rating 3 out of 5 stars.  2050 litres of boot space and 4×4 tenacity.

Jeep Grand Cherokee

An awesome, comfortable surfer’s wagon, the Jeep Grand Cherokee comes with a choice of a 3.6-litre petrol 8-speed automatic 4×4, or a 3.0-litre turbo-diesel 8 speed automatic 4×4.  True off-road potential and loads of space with up to 2005 litres of cargo space.  Offering between 184–522 kW (Yes, 522!) of power and 347–868 Nm of torque this packs a punch.  Superior 4×4 (AWD) ability make these ideal, and they are seriously comfortable.  All are 5-star safe.

I Like Them Big, I Like them Chunky!

Cars with the biggest boot space are always going to be the preferred vehicles for families.  Unless, of course, you’re a travelling salesman, builder, youth worker or schoolteacher, then the extra few cubes in the back are going to come in handy. What’s current out there that will prove a capable companion for taking three people (or more) in the back seats and a big load of luggage?

Tesla Model S (849 litres)

It might be surprising to see this addition on the list, but I’ll start with this one first because its topical.  Tesla’s lack of a conventional combustion engine and exhaust system works wonders for creating whopping luggage space! The electric motor in the Tesla Model S is very compact, providing the Model S with extra space to store luggage.  This Tesla has two large boot spaces where you’ll find one at the front and one at the rear.  A total of 849 litres of storage space is exceptionally fine for what is a performance EV sedan that can manage 0-100 km/h in around 3 seconds! However, buying new will set you back well north of $135k.

But now, to vehicles more conventional, and some with a buy new price that’s a whole lot cheaper than a Tesla Model S.

Peugeot 5008 (780 litres)

The snazzy new Peugeot is called the 5008, a family car that is anything but boring.  Two large infotainment screens, comfortable seats, seven-seating capacity or five, and you’ll be appreciating the talent offered by this roomy SUV.  Opt for five-seats up, and you’re left with a 780-litre boot.

Kia Sorento (660 litres)

The Kia Sorento is a class act.  It’s comfortable to drive and is also a handy tow vehicle, thanks to its punchy diesel engine and standard 4WD set-up.  Like the Peugeot above, the Sorento is eye-catching and good looking, and it also has seven seat capacity.  Drop the third row flat, and the Sorento boasts a decent 660-litre boot space that just loves to swallow suitcases and bags.

Skoda Superb Estate (660 litres)

One of my favourite vehicles on this list, the Skoda Superb Estate, has it all.  Not only is it not as bulky as an SUV, but the seats are superbly comfortable and spacious.  There is loads of practical interior space throughout the cabin.  Yes, it seats five adults in comfort and is one of the best cars with a big boot.  The big Skoda station wagon looks great and has a stylish cabin, with easy-to-use infotainment and acres of rear-seat legroom.  It’s also available with a strong range of grunty engines.

Skoda Karoq (588 litres)

Hello! Another Skoda?  The Karoq is Skoda’s mid-size crossover SUV.  It’s comfortable to drive with an excellent range of engines to choose from.  A high level of standard equipment, a nicely finished cabin and practicality is packed inside a Karoq.  Boasting VarioFlex Seats, three individual chairs that can slide, recline and be taken out entirely totally transforms the car and expands the boot space to suit.  The Karoq’s interior flexibility is unrivalled in this class of car, and you can also have it with 4WD.  The Skoda Kamiq is even bigger!

Volvo V60 (529 litres)

One of the suavest-looking station wagons in the list is the Volvo V60.  Its 529-litre boot space is the biggest you’ll find when pitched against its German rivals: the BMW 3 Series Touring, the Audi A4 Avant and the Mercedes C-Class Estate.  A beautiful modern Volvo interior with its metal, leather and wood trims, its portrait-style infotainment screen, outstanding comfort, and plenty of room for passengers deliver a fantastic package.  You also get a range of engines, which includes two powerful petrol hybrids that are quick.  If you’re looking for station wagon style along with boot capacity, then the Volvo is a winner here.

Mercedes E-Class Estate (640 litres)

With a little more room about its cabin than in the Volvo V60, the Mercedes E-Class Estate also boasts a few more cubes in its boot space.  Awesome infotainment and a range of new hybrid engines give this a drive to remember.  If you want a classy load-carrier that isn’t an SUV, then the E-Class has you covered.

Volkswagen Tiguan (615 litres)

The Tiguan’s boot offers 615 litres of luggage space when its rear seats have been slid right to the front.  This makes it a top rival to the other similar sized-and-priced Honda CR-V.  To look at, the Tiguan probably won’t win many beauty pageants, however it is a comfortable and practical choice with low running costs.

Honda CR-V (522 litres, 5-seater version)

Not the biggest boot on show here, but it boasts a practical shape and, with its comfortable cabin, the Honda CR-V is a nice small family alternative.  The engines are economical and very reliable, there are up to 7 seats, and it would be hard to find a better value large family car.  The seven-seater version hinders boot space somewhat, which drops to 497 litres with the seats up.  The CR-V packs a punch when it comes to standard safety kit.  Standard safety equipment includes lane assist, autonomous emergency braking and Isofix child seat mounting points.

SsangYong Rexton (820 litres)

Yes, there are plenty of other SUVs that have colossal boot space.  Big SUVs that include the Skoda Kodiaq (another Skoda), the BMW X5, Land Rover Discovery, Volvo XC90, BMW X7, Audi Q7, Hyundai Palasade, Land Rover Discovery, Toyota Land Cruiser, the Range Rover and even Nissan’s whopping Patrol.  If you can afford one of these, then all is well.  However, if you’re hoping for a big seven-seater SUV option, then there is the excellent SsangYong Rexton with its loads of space, excellent comfort and decent price tag that’s easily half the price of the afore mentioned alternatives.

Yes, the SsangYong Rexton is a rugged, tough and durable machine, but this big SUV is perfect for carrying large loads along with people in spacious comfort.  The Rexton boasts an impressive 820 litres of boot space with all the seats in place, and then a cavernous 1806 litres with all five rear seats lying flat.  4WD capacity makes this an adventurer, and its smooth, powerful 2.2-litre turbo-diesel engine can tow up to 3500 kg without even breaking a sweat.

Citroen C5 Aircross (720 litres)

The Citroen C5 Aircross has one of the most comfortable rides. It also gets a line-up of quiet, refined engines to go with its massive boot.  With the rear seats slid forward, there’s room for 720 litres of luggage in the boot, which then drops to 580 litres when the seats are in their rearmost position.  A very deep, square shape enables the boot to easily swallow bulky items, and the electric tailgate is a nice standard feature.  In terms of practicality, the C5 Aircross represents decent value for money with loads of comfort and practicality.

Citroen Berlingo Multispace (775 litres)

Staying on the with the Citroen theme, how about a new Citroen Berlingo Multispace?  Yes, it’s a bit different and an MPV type vehicle, but the French know all about space, comfort and practicality. Even the standard-sized Citroen Berlingo Multispace versions offer 775 litres of boot space with the rear seats up, but the seven-seat XL versions offer even more with 1050 litres of space, albeit with the third row of seats folded flat.

Mercedes V-Class (1030 litres)

Alright, I have indulged in one proper van, the Mercedes V-Class, also among the largest MPVs you can possibly buy.  I suppose there are any myriad of other passenger vans (e.g., Hyundai Staria, Ford Transit, Toyota Granvia) you could buy, but I’ve selected one of the best: the new Mercedes Vito van or V-Class, and with this vehicle you really are travelling in luxury and style. The V-Class can seat up to 8 passengers, but if you remove the third row of seats you’re left with a truly colossal 1,030-litre load area.

Above is a shortlist, really.  I haven’t mentioned other worthy contenders that could just as easily be added.  Vehicles like the Subaru Outback, BMW’s 5-series Wagon, the Honda Odyssey, the Mazda 6 Wagon, the Renault Koleos, or any of the dual cab utes are also pretty-adept at managing loads and people.

So, do you know a car that should be on this list – a vehicle that I’ve blatantly missed?  We need to know about it because there are people who are after such a vehicle – one that’ll shift loads of luggage and people.  Whether you prefer a crossover, an SUV, or a station wagon, now’s the time to let us know the best modern vehicles with big boots.

I need a bigger boot!

What Tyre do I Need?

Tyres are the most crucial component to any drive.  Safety matters out there on the roads, and ensuring that you have a good set of tyres rolling beneath your car makes all the difference to aspects of driving like your stopping ability, road holding capacity and anti-aquaplaning.

What the heck is aquaplaning?  You may have experienced aquaplaning already when driving on a wet road and in the rain where puddles have formed over the road.  Hit these puddles at a reasonable speed, and the tyres can skid over the top of the puddles, causing complete loss of traction to whichever tyre is aquaplaning at the time.  Aquaplaning and sliding in the wet can and unfortunately does cause accidents.

Obviously, slowing down in the wet helps lessen the chance of having an aquaplane experience.  However, there are other aspects to the tyre which can affect how your tyres will cope with puddles and water on the road during wet driving conditions.  The condition of the tyre, the tread pattern the tyre has, and the amount of tread depth left on the tyre all decide how your tyre will cope with wet road conditions. These three components combined with how fast your car is travelling are the main players to whether or not you’ll roll through the puddle, displacing the water, or skid over the top of the puddle in much the same way as a skim board does in the shallow water at the beach.

Tyres are the only element of a car that is in contact with the ground while driving.  Choosing the right tyres can increase the entire performance of your vehicle.  Every tyre has its strengths and weaknesses.  Some tyres are long-lasting, while others offer better grip.  Some tyres are designed to be quiet and smooth while driving, while others have a tread pattern designed for better fuel consumption.  There are tyre testers out there like, Tyre Lab at www.thetyrelab.com, that single out tyres that perform best for all road conditions or for certain types of road conditions.  However, it is a fairly well-known fact that the more you invest in a tyre, the better the tyre quality will be and, consequently, the safer your driving experience.  That said, you might be surprised (or not) at which tyres are rated highly for braking, anti -aquaplaning and road holding by The Tyre Lab.

By law, in Australia the minimum tread depth for a tyre is 1.5 mm.  When it’s raining, the tread is responsible for securing contact between the tyre and the road, effectively pushing the water out from under the tyre as it rolls along.

Need new tyres?

First, find out the specifications in size and type from your car’s manufacturer, and this is the best size to go for.  You can also find out what kind of tyres you need, by looking on the side wall of your current tyres.  You will see a combination of characters which look a bit like this: 215/55R17 94H.  If your car has been mucked with, then make sure you check the manufacturer’s specs.

You will need to have an idea of how much you are going to spend at the tyre shop.  Choosing between a premium tyre and value is not always easy, or maybe it’s just too easy.  There are even budget tyres, which can be good if you aren’t into driving quickly, however, if you do go for these, they won’t have the best grip for all occasions and for emergency situations in the wet and dry.

Tyre choice really does come down to your own individual needs, the weather conditions and climate you’ll be driving in, how icy or cold the roads can get, how hot it is, and definitely how hard and fast you drive your car.

Not all tyres are the same.  So, if you buy a premium tyre that is designed with performance ability and grip for extreme hard and fast driving, but you drive like a snail, you’ll be perfectly safe in all road conditions.  If on the other hand you drive like a racing car driver, where you pass every other car in sight, and yet you are driving with budget tyres, your safety and the safety of others will be massively compromised.

There are those of us who drive within the law and try to maintain a decent speed in all road and weather conditions.  We will try and slowdown in the wet for example.  We all need to be driving safely, yet it does help to know just what sort of tyres are on the car you drive and what they are capable of out there on the road.  Just as equally-valid is knowing just what your tyres are not capable of.  There is nothing worse than losing traction or have a tyre’s integrity let go in a life threatening situation.

Every journey is dependent on the performance of your tyres and their effect on your driving.  Tyres impact on your steering, acceleration, handling, and braking. They’re also a key part of your car’s suspension and braking systems.  If you don’t have the right tyres for your car, tyres that are legal and in good shape, you’re putting yourself, your passengers and other road users at risk.

Budget tyres versus Premium tyres

Even though all tyres look pretty much the same, the difference between a budget tyre and a quality tyre is huge.  It comes down to the fact that the quality of the materials used in creating a premium tyre just can’t be replicated in a cheaply-made tyre.

Premium tyres have to meet high standards and are therefore made with more steel and specially formulated rubber and silica compounds.  These high quality tyre materials ensure that the final product is much stronger, longer-lasting, and one that offers better grip than a cheap tyre option.

Premium tyre manufacturers focus on research and development, and often they will be linked with the motorsport world where competition in tyres really matters.  Years of testing has proven that premium tyres do perform better and more consistently than a cheaper tyre alternative.

Premium tyres generally include names like: Dunlop, Michelin, Pirelli, Bridgestone, Kumho, Hankook and Continental.  Manufacturers of quality tyres will achieve higher standards than a budget or value tyre in all aspects of a tyre’s job prescription.  This will include: good grip for all driving conditions, exceptional wet and dry braking, superior handling at any speed, a higher impact damage threshold, better load-carrying capability, a longer service life (unless, of course, they are track racing tyres with a super-soft compound for ultimate grip on the track), better fuel economy, improved driving comfort; reduced noise, vibration and harshness.

We hope this was helpful.

Keeping a Car’s Interior Clean

Cleaning our cars, inside and out, is a task that must be scheduled into the diary.  We make sure that the mechanical servicing is carried out regularly on time, as it’s an essential requirement for the reliability and roadworthiness of the vehicle.  If we like mechanical servicing to keeping the inside of the car in good shape, then cleaning and maintaining a vehicle’s interior and its bodywork also keeps the car in top shape for travelling.  A vehicle with a clean interior is so much nicer to travel inside, and your travelling companions will appreciate the way it looks, smells and feels.

If you live a busy life and find it difficult to find the time to clean and maintain the inside of your car, a good rule of thumb might be to do the interior cleaning whenever the car goes in for a mechanical WOF or a service.  At least this way you’ll be cleaning the car’s cabin and boot space properly once or twice a year.  Is that enough?  Probably not, but it’s a good place to start and something for you to work towards.

The purpose of cleaning your car’s interior is to keep the surfaces free from dust, grime and dirt.  This includes the dash and interior panelling, the carpets, and the seat upholstery.  Essentially, every surface of the vehicle’s interior needs to be cleaned, even the boot space.

After cleaning, any leather, wood or vinyl surfaces, they need to have a polishing layer applied, which is necessary to protect and maintain the surface’s integrity and lustre.  Any tears or rips in the upholstery can be repaired and fixed.

What is a good interior cleaning process?

Start by taking out any loose items that are inside the car.  Remove any rubbish.  You can use a vacuum cleaner to suck up the small, loose dust and rubbish on the car’s carpets and seats.  The vacuum cleaner head is a good shape for getting underneath the seats.  Don’t forget the boot, either.  The brush fitting works brilliantly over the fabric seats and the carpets.  You can also use the soft brush attachment on the dash fascia.

After vacuuming out the car’s interior, it is then necessary to attend to any stains and spills with a cleaning solution.  Leather and vinyl seats, also hard dash and door panel surfaces, can be wiped with a cloth that has been dampened with a solution of warm, soapy water.  Wipe down the steering wheel.  These surfaces can then be dried with another soft cloth, and you can even leave the car doors open for a while to let the fresh air run through the interior. Don’t forget to clean the seat belts while you’re at it.  You can follow this by vacuuming and cleaning the interior carpets

Leather, vinyl, plastic, and veneer surfaces are now ready to be buffed nicely to a shine with a soft dry cloth and furthermore protected with a suitable conditioner or polish.  Glass windows, the rear view mirror, and the driver’s display (digital or analogue) are best cleaned with a damp cloth, and then soon after dried fully with a scrunched up piece of soft newspaper or tissue paper.  Doing this ensures that no streaks or dust is left on the glass or displays with the final wipe down.

Now, remove the dashboard’s dust and grime with a damp dusting cloth.  After dusting, use a slightly damp microfiber cloth to remove any grime and fingerprints.   It’s amazing how well cotton swabs can to get into small spaces around vents and knobs.  It’s now time to clean the centre console, which is a common place for coffee and ice cream spills.

Finally, clean the door panels, handles and switchgear.

Hey presto, you’re good to go.  At this point it can also be nice to place an air freshener/fragrance sachet inside the cabin to last till the next cleaning session.

What Is and Isn’t Inside an EV?

What is an EV? What are the obvious things that set an EV apart from the more conventional car that’s powered by an internal combustion engine (ICE)?  And what is an EV like to maintain?

These are just a few of the good questions that might be rattling around in your mind as you consider the possibility of EV ownership.  Let’s face it, most of us probably jump inside our cars and give little thought to what happens inside a car when we drive off.

Let’s start by answering the first question and develop for ourselves an understanding of what an EV is.

The letters ‘EV’ stands for the words ‘electric vehicle’.  EVs don’t have a combustion engine underneath the bonnet, in fact they don’t have a combustion engine at all.  This means that you won’t need to pull over at the gas station to fill your car up with any form of fossil fuel (e.g., unleaded gasoline (91), premium unleaded gasoline (95, 98 or 100 octane) or diesel.  Neither will your car be running on gas (LPG or CNG).  You won’t even have to top your car up with engine coolant or oil for engine lubrication.  Sounds good!

Once you look away from the various processes of mining earth metals like lithium and cobalt (a by-product of nickel and copper mines); neodymium, terbium, or dysprosium (critical metals used in higher powered batteries that can last for longer distances – and everyone wants to be able to last longer) used in EV batteries and electronic componentry, EVs look to be more environmentally friendly and interesting cars to own and drive.

All your power is electronically accessible to your accelerator pedal, and your braking action is processed electronically as well.  When you brake or decelerate, battery power can be reverted back into the battery pack.  Basically, drain the battery in an EV, and you’ll need to plug it into a charging port again before you can get some power for driving about again.  However, that’s nothing new now, is it?

To get power from your house power supply, you’ll need to have a conversion kit built into your home’s power system in order to be able to power up your EV within a suitable time frame, commonly 6 to 10 hours.  More expensive options are available that will enable a quicker charging time.  To get power after commuting around the city, you’re going to require a charging station or a park at work that has a convenient and vacant plug-in port for you to charge your vehicle up again to get home.  There are some other charging stations (and we’ll need many more of these with more EVs running on the road) where you can park up for a couple of hours to recharge or top-up again for your commute home.  If you drive your EV out of town and into the country, you’ll need to be sure that you have enough power between charging ports, because, unlike in a vehicle with a combustion engine, a jerry can won’t get you out of trouble nor will the longest power cord.  I’m not sure what serious Outback off-roading enthusiasts will do if they drive an EV.  Neither am I sure what mobile ‘tradies’ will do when they get caught short on power between towns.

What is missing inside an EV that you have in a common ICE vehicle?

Noise is the first thing that comes to mind.  EVs do without the mechanical noise of the combustion/explosions that takes place inside a working ICE.  What you do get is a very quiet ride with a bit of road noise from the tyres and wind about the bodywork as it slips through the air.  Exhaust emissions are also a non-event.

EVs have no complex clutch or gearing, which means that EVs can accelerate smoothly and quickly, giving you the feeling that you’re driving a sports car.  Instant maximum torque is always accessible.

A purely electric EV has fewer moving parts.  There are only around about 20 moving parts in an electric motor, compared with nearly 2000 mechanical components in an ICE.  The result is that an EV will need less fiddly routine maintenance jobs like changing the engine oil every 10,000km.  You’ll still need to change the tyres on an EV, and you may go through more tyres because of all that instant torque and acceleration.  A pricier tyre made up of a softer compound might also be necessary in order for you to be able to stick to the road better with the EV’s instant and quick acceleration.

You will also need to replace the battery pack, as they do have a life.  This will be the one expensive maintenance bill.  Buy a new EV, and you’ll be able to put this off for 10 years or so.  Buy a second-hand EV, and who knows how long you’ll have before the battery pack will need replacing or you just won’t be going anywhere.

An EV owner will likely also need to pay some sort of road user charge or tax in the not-too-distant future, particularly if more EVs take to our roads.

However, own an EV and you won’t need an ICE tune-up or oil change, and the engine coolant won’t need to be replaced, either.  In essence, an EV has no petrol, diesel or oil.  It has no exhaust, no clutch or gears. It doesn’t have spark plugs, and it has no throbbing combustion noise that you find you get with a V8, a boxer or even a straight six.

As with any car, EVs have both their advantages and their disadvantages.  At this stage, an affordable EV would be a great and enjoyable car for the city environment.

EVs and Rare Earth Mining

Rare earth metals.

Where are all the earth’s rare metals mined?  Are electric vehicles (EVs) really so environmentally sound and friendly?

Rare earths are difficult to find and obtain in most parts of the world, and they are used a lot in all sorts of common and accessible products like mobile phones, cars, aeroplanes, missiles, radars etc.  Rare earths are also abundantly used in EVs.  EVs use special magnets to power their engines, and most of the magnets in EVs that can cover longer distances on one battery charge are made from rare earth metals.  The metals aren’t necessarily rare, but they can be dirty and difficult to process.  Many of the processes related to rare earth extraction (getting the rare earths out of the ground) are dangerous, environmentally unfriendly, and, in many cases, the mining workers are older boys and younger men.  The process to obtain many of the rare earths is environmentally destructive and produces radioactive waste.

Of the 17 rare earths, neodymium is possibly the most needed rare earth in the world right now.  EVs cannot function without neodymium, and lithium – which is currently mostly found in Bolivia.

China has a large portion of the rare earth mining pie and supply network.  Back in 2010, China produced as much as 90% of the rare earths that the world needed, and it now seems obvious to me why China’s economy and infrastructure was booming so much at the time.  Also, around this time, the rest of the world started to see just how China ruled the rare earth market and power struggles commenced.

Without the rare earth metal, neodymium, an iPhone cannot vibrate and wind turbines would not work.  In order for EVs to gain more milage between charges, Rare Earth Permanent Magnets (REPM), which use neodymium, are required.  REPMs are the most powerful magnets currently available.

So, though rare-earth elements are used in trace amounts, their unique properties, which include magnetic, heat-resistant, and phosphorescent qualities, make them essential in the production of products like batteries, car engines, EVs and LCD TV displays.  EV motors, iPhones, military jet engines, batteries, and even satellites all have something in common: They require rare-earth elements to function.

Other elements like terbium, tritium and europium are crucial to targeting mechanisms in all high-tech weaponry systems.  The higher-tech that an EV becomes, a corresponding increase in the level of rare earth mining will be required.  The more EVs that are run on the roads (resulting from strict emission standards and government taxing), the more the rare earth resources will be called upon to build and maintain the EV fleet.  Currently, an EV battery doesn’t last much longer than 10 years, so EV battery replacement requirements will mean that much more rare earth metals will be needed to maintain the ever-growing global EV fleet.

As of 2018, China had 37% of the world’s rare earth deposits.  Brazil currently has 22%, Vietnam 18%, Russia 10% and India has 5.8%. The rest of the world, including the US and Japan, have the rest.

Despite having more rare earth ore than the US, India only mined 3,000 tonnes of rare earths in 2020.  During 2020, the US mined 38,000 tonnes. Meanwhile, Australia mined 17,000 tonnes and China mined 140,000 tonnes.  In 2020, the US had 16% of the production rate of the world’s rare earths; Australia had 7%, and India had 1%.

In 2020, the following countries were the biggest producers of rare earth metals:

China, mine production: 140,000 MT

United States, mine production: 38,000 MT.  The US is also a major importer of rare earth materials, with their demand for compounds and metals worth US$110 million in 2020.  The US has classified rare earths as critical minerals, and it is a distinction that has come about from recent trade issues between the US and China.

Myanmar (also known as Burma), mine production: 30,000 MT.  Myanmar mined 30,000 MT of rare earths in 2020, up from 22,000 MT the previous year.  Myanmar provided 50% of China’s medium to heavy rare earths feedstock.

Australia, mine production: 17,000 MT.  Australia holds the sixth largest-known rare earths reserves in the world.  It is poised to increase its output, where the production of neodymium-praseodymium products is projected to increase to 10,500 tonnes per year by 2025.  Northern Minerals opened Australia’s first heavy rare earths mine in 2018.  Its main products are terbium and dysprosium, the latter of which is used in technology for things like permanent magnets.

Madagascar, mine production: 8,000 MT.

India, mine production: 3,000 MT.  India holds almost 35% of the world’s total beach sand mineral deposits.

Russia, mine production: 2,700 MT.  Russia intends to increase the nation’s share of global rare earths production from the current 1.3% level to 10% by 2030.

Thailand, mine production: 2,000 MT.

Vietnam, mine production: 1,000 MT.

Brazil, mine production: 1,000 MT.

Rare-earths are also mined in South Africa, Canada, Estonia, and Malaysia.

Is an internal combustion engine’s resultant emissions and fossil fuel use really worse than the rare earth metal production mining for EVs and other high-tech electronics?  I would question whether a modern and new internal combustion engine with its catalytic converter to capture any emissions is worse than an EV’s definite connection to negative environmental impact and questionable work-force ethics.

Sometimes it is easier to disregard these pre-showroom EV facts and talk about the post-showroom EVs being so wonderful and environmentally-friendly with their so-called zero emissions.  Perhaps hydrogen-fuelled cars (to a certain extent), solar energy, and, definitely, cars running on biofuels are a sounder transport investment, but I guess money, power and business links still talk louder for some.

EV Revolution

Let’s ditch fossil fuels and crude oil for a while, since some say that oil is considered environmentally unclean and unfit for burning.  So, what about electric?  Which of our earth’s finite resources are needed to make electric vehicles (EVs)?  It will be Tanzania, Venezuela, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Canada or even Brazil who could be the providing the rest of the world with precious raw metals that the greener EV requires.

As electric cars appear to be going mainstream and all our main automotive manufactures look to ditch internal combustion engines (ICEs) by 2025-ish, these big automotive giants have to source and make investments into electric cars and their necessary componentry.  Countries like South Africa, Tanzania, China and even Australia have very mineral-rich and rare metal resources.  These countries and their mining industries are the world’s best environmentally friendly strategy to power EVs and their mass production.

There is a global race on that is driving the demand for countries, including quite a few in Africa, to mine as much of their precious metal resources to equip the world with a greener fleet of vehicles.  This clambering for sourcing all the right stuff for EV production en masse could soon provide billions of dollars into certain countries’ GDP rates.

Rare metals like copper, lithium, cobalt and nickel are some of the most discussed metals in EV production demands.  Other metals like neodymium (a rare earth metal), aluminium and zinc have emerged as some other new resources that will be needed in the rapid quest for a greener world. Statista, a German company specializing in market and consumer data, estimates that the demand for metals such as nickel, aluminium, and iron (all the critical components in EVs) will jump to as much as 14 times the rate that it is now by 2030.  This huge demand for environmentally friendly EV minerals for meeting the green EV car revolution will provide a great cash injection for a well-endowed African state.  Demand for metals like lithium and graphite are also expected to rise substantially, even by as much as 9-10 times by 2030.

The large estimated increase (14x) in demand for the clean EV minerals to meet the intended global EV production rates over the next ten years is accompanied by the need for vehicle battery outputs and infrastructure, which are expected to rise by millions of times over in the very near future.  Even Toyota recently announced a 13.6 billion US investment into electric cars and hybrids, with some 9 billion US dollars to be spent on battery production alone.  This is fantastic news for the environment and carbon zero.

The increase in demand for these rare and hard to obtain metals is pushing top mining and big investment companies around the globe to invest in the acquisition of key materials used in the production of EV batteries, EVs themselves, and their much needed electrical infrastructure.  Solar energy componentry, as well as the EV requirements, all point towards an enormous boom in demand for these rare and hard to reach resources, as well as creating an opportunity to make even more money than the awful and “dirty” fossil fuel endeavours.

It is expected that the sales and production of EVs will continue to accelerate quickly over the next five years.  Big automotive giants who are changing to larger-scale EV production have major mining countries like South Africa, Namibia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Tanzania, Zimbabwe and Botswana on their radar.  These are just some of the main African countries, let alone other countries around the world, who enjoy bountiful reserves of some of the world’s most precious metals and minerals: minerals such as gold, diamond, cobalt, iron ore, coal, and copper.  Meeting the demands by governing authorities and their growing appetite for better and greener EVs will be much better for the environment – and for special places like Africa, I’m sure.

President Hakainde Hichilema is the new president for Zambia, and he has recently announced plans to ramp up mining in particular, and to jump-start Zambia’s economy.  Part of his economic plan provides for the rapidly growing EV battery industry, with cobalt and copper identified as key components.  The workforce will be a great place for young men from the age of 15 years old, who will be able to work in the dangerous mining industry.  Countries like Zambia and Tanzania are working hard to supply the developed countries of the world with the rare metals. The developed countries are considered to have a higher status and economic standing, a better understanding of the environment, human ethics, health and emission standards.  Their demand for a green EV world is a good thing for all people and the environment.

As the big green machine, Tesla, and auto giant Toyota are joined by other larger EV-producing manufacturers, African mining countries are going to have to move faster than ever to meet the demand put on them by the governing authorities of the world and their ever-increasing and severe carbon emission goals and standards.  The president of Zambia, Mr. Hichilema, has wasted no time in announcing his administration’s hopes to quickly provide the clean EV battery supply chain and invest much of his country’s proceeds into its development.

Rare metals and their difficult and extensive underground extraction methods are needed in EV lithium ion battery technology and are critical for improving the driving range of electric vehicles so that they can compete with the best, most frugal, “archaic” ICE technology and emission-capturing methods. These rare metals are buried beneath the fields of African nations, ready to be harvested by economically sound, rich and developed countries with zero carbon emission goals and standards.

South Africa, a mining giant, has also announced plans to set up production plants to manufacture EVs of their own, including plants for the manufacture of EV components, such as EV batteries.  This could see South Africa as one of the multi-billion-dollar raw material producers of the world.  South Africa already has its raw material extraction industry, its capital markets, and its existing manufacturing and export infrastructure to build upon.

Environmentally friendly keywords that current governments, economists and greenies around the world are sharing with the public are words like carbon emissions, climate change, EVs, EV infrastructure, mining, metals, zero carbon, clean technology, investment and climate crisis.  All of these keywords correspond with the rising demand for the precious metals used in EV production.

As it stood in 2020, the total global nickel reserves amounted to approximately 94 million metric tons.  Of that amount, it was Indonesia that held the world’s largest share.  Following the tropical and beautiful Indonesia is Australia, with our nickel reserves estimated to be 20 million metric tons.  Best we get stuck in, then!

ICE to EV Conversions

Converting your favourite drive over to electricity seems like a reasonable alternative to buying a brand new EV with a massive price ticket now, doesn’t it?  Flicking through the list of brand new EVs that you can currently buy in Australia soon has you eyeing up figures of well over $50 k.  At the moment, the cheapest EV in Australia is the MG ZS EV with its $45k price tag.  A bog standard Nissan LEAF comes with a drive away price of around $54k.  How about a Tesla?  Anywhere from $65–93k will get you into a Model 3.  Converting an older classic car to full battery-electric power has coolness written all over it.  The end result might even gain you a Greta Thunberg award!

Is it possible?  Can we convert a favourite oil burner to electric power?  If I was to convert my drive to EV, it would have to be a conversion of a favourite car – something like an old Falcon or Commodore.  Bringing one of these ideal cruisers up to EV spec would be a challenge, but a challenge with great satisfaction.  Installing an electric drivetrain into an old vehicle could help keep some classics on the road and out of the scrapyard.  Why not take the restoration, recycling and retrofitting to the next level and repower classic cars?

There have already been a few conversions of this sort of thing in certain areas around the globe, usually in someone’s garage late at night, where the candle burns bright and long into the night.  Considering performance enhancements alone, a good off-the-shelf electric drive system will almost always be a substantial performance upgrade for an old daily driver.  Even some of the muscle car straight six or V8 powerplants are humbled by a rather conventional EV motor with its instant torque availability.

Converting a petrol or diesel car into an electric one means replacing its combustion engine and fuel system with an electric motor coupled with a traction battery. Although the procedure looks relatively straightforward at first glance, it does mean that you do need to apply sound physics and DIY know-how on electrics to get yourself a car that moves in the right direction safely.  There is some pretty high voltage happening beneath the skin of your old, converted classic that enables it to whistle up to 100 km/h in seven seconds, or less.  Conversions are a substantial cost and do require appropriate re-certification tickets.  However, the whole ordeal should cost quite a lot less than a new EV, at least by a few thousand when compared to a Tesla.

Things to work through.

Installing an electric motor into a gas or diesel car’s chassis and platform requires the skill to build up a drive train and axle to get the power from the electric motor out onto the road.  The old gearbox that was essential to the old internal combustion engine (ICE) design is a useless mechanism for the new electric motor.  The old gearbox has to go, and a new drive mechanism has to be designed and implemented.

The weight of the vehicle and the dimensions of the wheels directly impact on the choice of brakes and suspension.  Not always but, more often than not, the car with a heavy battery pack will weigh more than the original set up.  In order to function safely with the added weight and/or changes in weight distribution, the converted car must have some structural strengthening, brake and suspension upgrades and some modifications done in order to ensure that the changes marry up into a harmonious mode of EV transportation and driving pleasure.

The battery pack isn’t going to be cheap.  You’ll easily spend in excess of $10–15k for a lithium-ion battery pack that is able to offer a respectable range over 100 km.  Lead-acid batteries, like those used in golf carts, can often be installed, though they typically deliver a rather small operating range on one charge. Lithium cells are smaller and lighter, and can enable longer ranges, but they’re more expensive.  How many batteries you’ll require will depend on the vehicle you’ve chosen and the space available in which to have them fitted.  The new battery pack, as mentioned above, is very heavy and has to be carefully installed inside the car’s framework in a way that won’t compromise occupant space and safety, as well as ensuring excellent on-road behaviour.

One other small thing to think about is how you will heat or cool the cabin.  ICE vehicles used the heat that comes from the engine design, but EVs need to run a different set up.

EV enthusiasts usually favour smaller and lighter vehicles for conversion, though the size of your wallet will also control what you can and can’t afford.

ICE to EV Conversions

Popular choices of cars that have been converted have been cars like the Honda Civic, VW Beetles, the Fiat 124 Spider, the Triumph Spitfire and MGs of the same era, Mazda Miatas or MX-5s, Toyota MR2s, and various Porsches. Pickup trucks and utes are also easy converters because they already have a big tray out the back to accommodate heavy batteries.

Mat Coates from Nelson, NZ, saw the potential of electric cars as a youngster who messed around with remote-controlled vehicles at age 10.  His first conversion was a Mitsubishi GTO, so there’s an inspiration for you.  How hard can it really be? All things considered, where there’s a will there’s a way.  As long as you tick all the boxes and do the job right first time and do it well.  A quiet classic that has been converted to EV propulsion is hard to beat and a rather special way of getting around.

A good place to start might also be to talk to the people at https://www.evolutionaustralia.com.au.  These people already have experience in converting ICE vehicles over to being an EV.

Hyundai and Hydrogen

I’m showing my age a bit when I say that I can remember some of the earlier Hyundai cars – the Hyundai Pony and Hyundai Excel come to mind.  Back in the 80s and early 90s, Hyundai cars were light, comfortable, and not really up to the same safety standards as the cars that were produced in other parts of the world.  Nowadays, however, the story is completely different, and the South Korean automaker often tops crash safety tests with their vehicles, the vehicles are still comfortable, and the style and technology has won many awards.  Hyundai has been always improving to the point where they are now a premium brand, very desirable, and leading the world on many fronts.  Key new innovations from the Hyundai Motor Company (HMC) team are exciting and are part of Hyundai’s vision for building a cleaner, greener world that includes vehicles that no longer rely on fossil fuels.

Because of the past couple of years, where covid has taken the world’s centre stage, there has been a big shortage of semiconductors in the auto industry, to the point that some auto manufacturers have had to shut down.  Semiconductors are used in the manufacture of electronic devices, including diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits.  These devices have a wide application in anything electronic, including laptops, computers, appliances, and, of course, the modern automobile.

Like all vehicle manufacturers, HMC has been affected by the shortage and have had to temporarily suspend some of their factories.  Despite the shortage, however, along with Toyota and Tesla, Hyundai is among a handful of automakers that actually increased their global sales despite the chip shortage.

However, Hyundai now plans to develop and build its own semiconductors so that they are not so reliant on chipmakers from other corners of the globe.  Hyundai wants to make sure it has a steady supply of semiconductors for their projects on-and-into the future by making its own.  It will be the parts and service arm for Hyundai, Kia and Genesis who would play a key role in the in-house development.  Stockpiling the electronic chips would be important for Hyundai, so that when other global crisis occur, they will then be in a better position to weather the storm.  Toyota and Tesla have already had stockpile contingency plans in place for some time, which has ensured that they fared well during covid.

Hyundai and Hydrogen

Hyundai are part of the Hydrogen Heavy Duty Vehicle Industry Group – comprised of hydrogen industry leaders Air Liquide, Hyundai, Nel Hydrogen, Nikola Corporation, Shell and Toyota.  This Group has signed agreements with Tatsuno Corporation and Transfer Oil S.p.A. to industrialize globally-standard 70 MPa hydrogen heavy-duty vehicle high-flow (H70HF) fuelling hardware componentry.  But, also, in Incheon, which is just west of Seoul, and in Ulsan, production plants will begin producing the hardware in the 2nd half of 2023 with an annual capacity of 100,000 hydrogen fuel cell systems.

South Korea’s influence on core Hydrogen components will see it as the world’s largest fuel cell production capacity, which will also help the HMC to diversify their business and tap into construction machinery and logistics equipment.

EVs might be the big talking point for some, but it is hydrogen that is the dark horse in the clean-green race.  These two new fuel cell plants in Korea will accelerate the hydrogen economy and secure broader global market dominance.  I reckon that Australia could be a hub for Hydrogen in the Pacific, don’t you think?

Hyundai’s wide-ranging hydrogen revolution accelerates with the showing of their 500 kW Vision FK sports car prototype and the e-Bogie autonomous commercial transport vehicles.  HMG recently announced that it will launch next-generation hydrogen fuel-cell power units in 2023 that will double the power output, halve the cost, and reduce package size by 30%, when compared to current systems.  Hyundai has a plan to offer “hydrogen for all” by 2040.

Hyundai’s Hydrogen Timeframe

In case you were not already aware, HMG is the parent of Hyundai, Kia and Genesis.  By 2028, HMG says it will have applied fuel-cell systems to all of its heavy commercial vehicle models, including large trucks, significantly reducing transport-related CO2 emissions.

Hydrogen Fuel Cells

By 2030, Fuel-Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEV) will have achieved price parity with Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV), HMG says.  And by 2040, HMG expects hydrogen to be available for everyone, for all vehicle types, and globally, triggering a lifestyle revolution.

Models for the Future

The Vision FK sports car is a 500 kW, hydrogen-powered high-performance prototype coupe that is capable of accelerating from 0-100 km/h in less than 4 seconds, while still offering a range of 600 km between top ups.  The Vision FK’s fuel cell unit carries N Performance branding, suggesting that it would be a future Hyundai N model rather than a luxury-focused Genesis.  HMG’s head of R&D, Albert Biermann, would not be drawn on when the Vision FK would go from prototype to production, but he did confirm that the next-generation Nexo fuel-cell SUV will launch “in the second half of 2023 followed by a Staria” The Staria is a people mover recently launched in Australia.  “We are also working, of course, on fuel-cell cars for Kia and Genesis. That will take a little longer time. After 2025 you can expect further fuel cell applications.”

The e-Bogie commercial application is a fuel-cell-powered autonomous trailer that could revolutionise commercial transportation.  Biermann also stated, “We are working full throttle on commercial [first] because that is the most effective way to avoid CO2. We are putting a lot of focus on fuel cells, not only for passenger cars but also for commercial vehicles.”

HMG’s Chairman, Euisun Chung, is even more emphatic about the significance of hydrogen fuel cell applications toward a sustainable future.  “This may be the last train to a Hydrogen Society, and time is running out. Hydrogen is the most powerful and pragmatic solution to overcoming environmental challenges. Hydrogen mobility will accelerate human progress.”

He went on to say that Australia may have a role to play.  “We know Australia is a country with vast and abundant renewable energy.  We are exploring business opportunities in Australia with our partners. Our goal is to build a sustainable ecosystem for [a] global hydrogen society.”

He also said that, “We will not immediately phase out internal combustion engines (ICE) commercial vehicles, but we are not starting any new developments of ICE. No new models and no new platforms. Everything will go forward with BEVs and FCEVs.”

Interestingly, according to Hyundai’s head of fuel cell development, Mr Saehoon Kim, FCEV technology has one huge advantage over BEVs: “The main problem with [a] BEV is the scalability of batteries. For a small EV it’s okay, but for commercial large scale [operation] the question immediately is …. How are we going to stack all these batteries with the heavy weight, and who is going to be happy with the low range? So, in this case fuel cell fits perfectly.”

Hyundai’s heavy commercial fuel cell program is already well advanced. In mid-2020, 45 Hyundai Xcient fuel cell trucks began commercial operation in Switzerland. Biermann stated that the trucks covered 210,000 kilometres per month and have saved 130 tonnes of CO2 emissions every month in operation.

The key to Hyundai’s commercial strategy is its third-generation fuel-cell system, which is in the final stages of development. Hyundai expects to launch two units in 2023, one producing 100 kW for passenger vehicles and SUVs (including the next Nexo and Staria FCEVs), and a 200 kW unit for commercial applications.  It has been said that by using two fuel-cell systems for trucks Hyundai can provide around 350 kW, which is equivalent to the power of current diesel engines used in trucking logistics.

This is all very exciting news and one that I have welcomed hearing.  I’m a fan of the new hydrogen fuel-celled vehicle technology moving forward.  This is Hyundai at its best, and we can only continue to watch this space.

Current Hyundai achievements:

The current ICE Hyundai i20 N has been crowned champion of Top Gear’s Speed Week.  The 26 fastest cars in the world participated in Top Gear’s Speed Week 2021.  It was the Hyundai· i20 N’s sharp handling and everyday usability that stood out to those in the Top Gear team.

Hyundai i20N